What is the Best Toothpaste That is Safe and Non Toxic?

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Everyone loves a healthy smile. That's why most of us are big fans of minty fresh toothpaste that foams in our mouths and leaves us with pleasant breath. If it feels and tastes so good, it must be good for our teeth, right?

It might come as a surprise to you, but many of the ingredients in conventional toothpastes are not only of questionable value for your oral health, but they are also dangerous for your overall wellbeing.

That's why the best oral hygiene routines include a non toxic toothpaste.

Top 5 Non Toxic Tooth​​​​​​pastes

Conventional Toothpaste

Manufacturers have led us to believe that the only way to have healthy teeth is to spread a wide swath of brightly-colored toothpaste across our brushes and use it to fill our mouths with bubbly foam.

Where do all of those colors and bubbles come from? They're the result of chemicals, many of them not so healthy for us.

What Chemicals and Materials Are Found in Most Toothpaste?

Chemical or Material

Health Hazards

Safe to Use?

Fluoride

Too much ingestion (swallowing of fluoride), especially in children, can lead to many health problems, including those on this list:

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    Skeletal fluorosis
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    Dental fluorosis
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    Possible osteosarcoma, a form of cancer
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    Hyperparathyroidism
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    Neurological issues

NO???

Possibly OK for topical application, but too much ingestion can lead to problems

Sodium Laureth Sulfate

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    Possible canker sores

NO???

More research needed - We lean towards NO

Triclosan

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    Endocrine disrupter
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    Possible cancer

NO!

Diethanolamine

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    Possible cancer
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    Possible organ toxicity

NO!

Artificial Sweeteners

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    Possible mood problems
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    Possible dizziness
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    Possible digestive issues

NO???

More research needed - We lean towards NO

Artificial Colors

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    Possible behavior problems
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    Possible cancer

NO???

More research needed - We lean towards NO

Glycerin

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    Could weaken teeth over time

NO???

More research needed - We lean towards NO

Fluoride

No??? Possibly OK for topical application, but too much ingestion can lead to health problems. Therefore, we choose to leave it out of our toothpaste recommendations.

Toothpaste companies claim that the fluoride in their formulas will protect your teeth, but in fact, swallowing too much fluoride can discolor your teeth, a condition known as dental fluorosis. Also of concern, its use has been connected to lower IQs in children.

Keep in mind that ingesting too much fluoride can actually kill you. In fact, there's more than enough fluoride in one tube of toothpaste to be lethal to a young child.

Now, consider also that research has shown that you swallow about one-third of the toothpaste that you use. No, that's nowhere near a lethal dose, but it does make you wonder how safe fluoridated toothpaste really is.

Sodium Laureth Sulfate

No?? More research needed; we lean toward no

Found in many personal care products, SLS creates suds. It's what makes conventional shampoos bubbly, and it's also what causes toothpaste to foam up in your mouth.

On the plus side, it's been shown that SLS doesn't lead to cancer as once suspected. That's a good thing, but it still isn't the best thing to include in toothpaste because it is irritating to the sensitive tissue in your mouth. It may cause canker sores and or delay their healing.

Triclosan

No!

Triclosan is used for its antibacterial and antifungal properties. Although killing bacteria in your mouth sounds like a good thing, in actuality, you risk altering the levels of good bacteria that are there. Getting rid of good bacteria can promote infection or cause stinky breath.

Even worse, triclosan may have serious long-term health effects. Studies have indicated that this chemical might mess with your hormones, cause reproductive problems or damage your heart muscle.

Fortunately, more and more major toothpaste brands are removing triclosan from their formulas.

Diethanolamine

No!

Also known as DEA, diethanolamine is used to help toothpaste foam. It's a pleasant sensation but not worth the health risks.

DEA can mix with other chemicals--including other chemicals in toothpaste--and create carcinogenic compounds. In fact, EWG's Skin Deep Database classifies DEA as a high risk because of cancer concerns, potential irritation and organ toxicity.

Artificial Sweeteners

No?? More research needed; we lean toward no

Most people want their toothpaste to taste good. To achieve that, manufacturers often add artificial sweeteners to their formulas. Aspartame is a common one.

The American Cancer Society insists that aspartame is safe for human consumption and not linked to long-term health effects, including cancer.

However, because many people feel that aspartame causes them to experience unpleasant side effects, such as dizziness, mood problems and digestive distress, research is ongoing. In the meantime, avoiding this ingredient is a wise choice.

Artificial Colors

No?? More research needed; we lean toward no

Most toothpastes get their pretty colors from artificial dyes. They might look nice, but most aren't too kind to your body. They've been linked to carcinogenic chemicals, allergic reactions and children's behavior problems.

Glycerin

No?? More research needed; we lean toward no

As an ingredient in personal care products, glycerin is reasonably safe. In fact EWG's Skin Deep database rates it as a low hazard.

However, when applied to your teeth, it can form a film over them. This coating can weaken teeth over time because it keeps them from being remineralized.

Nontoxic Toothpaste

Never fear, though! You can have a clean, healthy smile even if you don't use any of the major brand-name toothpastes on the market. Instead, you can pick your favorite natural or organic toothpaste and use it to keep your teeth healthy and white.

What Chemicals and Materials Are Usually Found in Most Toothpaste?

Activated Charcoal

Activated Charcoal

Some toothpaste uses activated charcoal to knock out stains and whiten teeth. Charcoal's porous nature makes it handy for grabbing and holding onto toxins, possibly including toxins in your mouth and on your teeth.

Many users do report noticeably whiter teeth after brushing with charcoal toothpaste. Keep in mind, though, that studies on the safety of brushing with charcoal are limited, and some dentists caution that charcoal might also absorb good bacteria or medications from your system.

Sea Salt

Sea Salt

Genuine sea salt contains minerals and elements that have strengthening and healing properties for your teeth. Salt can help take care of bad bacteria in your mouth. It may also reduce inflammation and counter the effects of acidic foods.

Baking Soda

Baking Soda

The abrasive nature of baking soda helps clean away the yuck on your teeth. But, while it's strong enough to help knock out plaque, you don't have to worry that it's so strong that you'll damage your enamel. In fact, it's less abrasive than commercial toothpastes.

Plus, baking soda helps neutralize odors, so it's good for freshening breath. It can also help fight bacteria and destructive acids.

Essential Oils

Essential Oils

Natural toothpastes may contain essential oils to give the formula an appealing flavor. Even more important, however, are the antibacterial properties that some essential oils provide. Mint oils are particularly useful in this regard.

Bentonite Clay

Bentonite Clay

It might sound strange to use volcanic ash on your teeth, but that's pretty much what bentonite clay is.

Despite its surprising origins, bentonite clay is rich in minerals that are beneficial for your body. Also, this clay is said to have the power to draw toxins out of your body. In other words, it puts good things in and takes bad ones out.

A Word of Caution

When shopping for a natural toothpaste, take time to read the label carefully. Just because a product is labeled "natural," that does not mean that it is actually the best natural toothpaste for you. Many so-called natural brands include sodium lauryl sulfate, fluoride, glycerin and other questionable ingredients in their formulas.

Seals of Approval

When shopping for the best toothpaste, keep your eyes open for special seals of approval. Two of the main ones to be on the lookout for are certifications that the product is organic or vegan.

Another seal worth looking for is one that assures that a product is GMO-free. This means that it is free of genetically modified ingredients.

Finally, cruelty-free products are not tested on animals nor are any animals harmed in their manufacturing process. One cruelty-free certification for which to look is Leaping Bunny.

Powdered Toothpaste

Some natural toothpastes come in powder form. Using a product like this can seem quite different than the pastes or gels that you are probably used to.

Fortunately, learning to use tooth powder is easy. Once you get your brush wet, the powder will stick to it. Just dip your damp brush in the container to pick up some tooth powder. If you prefer, you can fill a squirt bottle with the powder and use it to dispense a bit onto your brush.

Once the powder is on your brush, just move the brush around on your teeth like you do with any other toothpaste.

To see the process in action--and discover a recipe for making your own tooth powder--watch this video.

The Top 5 Nontoxic Toothpaste... Reviewed

When searching for the best toothpaste for your nontoxic lifestyle, consider your priorities. Is it more important to you to have a toothpaste without fluoride, SLS and glycerin, or is it more important to find the natural product that most closely resembles conventional toothpaste?

Once you have that decided, it will be easier for you to select the best natural toothpaste for you and your family. The following five reviews will get you started.

Earthpaste Toothpaste

Price

$

Our Rating

Earthpaste relies on Redmond bentonite clay to clean and strengthen teeth. In fact, that's one of the only ingredients in this simple, powerful toothpaste. The short ingredient list makes this product one of the best toothpaste options for many people. It's just clay, salt, xylitol, essential oils and water.

PROS

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    Contains salt for antibacterial properties​​​
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    Comes in multiple flavors
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    Smooth and not gritty
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    Contains no fluoride, glycerin, or SLS

CONS

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    Some concern about lead in the natural clay
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    Uses xylitol for sweetening, and not much is known about xylitol's long term effects
Auromere toothpaste

Price

$$

Our Rating

Auromere's toothpaste without fluoride relies on the oral cleansing properties of barks, roots and other plant-derived ingredients to get your teeth clean. The natural formula features neem and peelu, both known as "toothbrush trees." The paste does, however, contain glycerin.

If having SLS free toothpaste is important to you, be sure to look for the Foam-free varieties of this paste. The flavors that don't have that term on the box do use sodium lauryl sulfate that was derived from coconut oil. The Foam-free paste is available in Cardamom-fennel and Freshmint varieties.

PROS

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    Available in two SLS free flavors
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    Plant based ingredient list
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    Cardamom fennel paste is  ideal for those avoiding mint in a homeopathic lifestyle

CONS

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    Contains glycerin
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    Color and texture reminds some users of mud or clay
Primal Life Toothpowder

Price

$$$$

Our Rating

This tooth powder offers you the benefits of both charcoal toothpaste and organic toothpaste in one product. This best whitening toothpaste is also available in a Black Spearmint variety.

PROS

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    Organic ingredients
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    Acceptable for use by those on paleo diets
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    Charcoal makes it one of the best whitening toothpaste options

CONS

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    With no sweeteners, taste takes some flavor adjustment
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    High Price
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    Powdered formula can take some getting used to
Dr. Bronner's toothpaste

Price

$

Our Rating

The famous soapmaker, Dr. Bronner's, also makes toothpaste. In fact, Dr. Bronner's product is a good option for those looking for organic toothpaste because it is made with 70 percent organic ingredients. It is an SLS free toothpaste and doesn't contain fluoride.

However, it does contain glycerin. It also has carrageenan, which is a thickener derived from seaweed. This ingredient has been linked to digestive problems.

PROS

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    70% percent organic ingredients
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    GMO free, cruelty free, and vegan
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    Three flavor options: Peppermint, Cinnamon, and Anise

CONS

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    Contains glycerin
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    Also has carrageenan
Jason Healthy Mouth Toothpaste

Price

$

Our Rating

Jason's fluoride free toothpaste uses tea tree oil because of its antibacterial properties. The formula is also SLS-free and contains no gluten. It is a good choice for those who want a toothpaste that is similar to regular options on the market, but it does contain glycerin.

PROS

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    Has organic tea tree oil
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    Resembles conventional pastes but is an SLS and fluoride free toothpaste
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    Contains healthy CoQ10

CONS

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    Contains glycerin
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    Also has carrageenan

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Written by Ashley

Chief editor here at Nontoxic Reboot. I'm passionate about providing you with the best and easiest ways to make your world healthier and a little less toxic.

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